A Trip to Philly to celebrate stories in a vending machine and do my first reading

UPDATE: Many of you asked how to purchase these stories. They are now available here for $3 (shipping included.)
I spent last evening in Philadelphia, dreaming words on the train, sitting on the benches in Rittenhouse Square, looking up, in the wet dark, at the twinkling Christmas lights. Then, I walked down a blue lit path on 22nd street and went to the Science Leadership Academy. It’s a school I’ve heard about and wondered about. I’ve seen the TED Talks and articles and the PBS stories about the work this school is doing and how it is inspiring others to relook at their own models of education and follow suit. 
I was there for the launch party of the 4th Floor Chapbook series, an awesome publishing venture from the Head and the Hand Press in collaboration with SLA’s students and staff. See that vending machine in the photo? It’s selling chapbooks. Snackable stories. My story, The Song Inside, sits alongside some amazing work and it was so cool to be a part of it. 
I wore flowered tights and, you guys, I did my first reading in front of a live audience over the age of six — feeling very grateful for my friend Tracy, who used to make me read my work aloud in her living room, but only after giving me liquid courage in the form of wine. Don’t worry, I was completely sober for this experience, unless you count the delicious potato chips I had beforehand. 
I was able to talk with Nic Esposito, who founded the Head and the Hand Press and told me stories of his son and his urban farm, which he wrote about in his collection of essays, Kensington Homestead. Linda Gallant, who might be the nicest person ever and it’s clear, took great care with our stories. The author Jennifer Hubbard, who read from her fantastic story In Memory of Lester, and advised me where to get middle-eastern food. And Robert Marx, a senior at SLA, who is waiting for his college acceptances, no doubt to do great things wherever he ends up. He blew me away with his story, Fade to Black, which I read on the train ride home. 
It meant a lot to me, to share my work in such a unique venue. My story sits next to great talent. To pop in a few dollars and watch books fall through the machine was a great thrill. If you can’t make it to the school itself, I hope to be able to point you toward the place to purchase these stories in a few weeks. 
Thank you to Beth Kephart, who told me about this series. If you haven’t noticed, she pretty much points me toward everything awesome.
Now, I must return to my regular scheduled programming in our Brooklyn apartment. Little O has found the recycling bin, its contents are in a pile at my feet as I write, and I think he just tried to bite into a metal can.

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10 thoughts on “A Trip to Philly to celebrate stories in a vending machine and do my first reading

  1. That is SO awesome! A vending machine that delivers books? If only every vending machine in this country delivered books!

    And I've met Beth at several events — and Jennifer Hubbard at even more events — The world of writers is smaller than we realize.

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  2. What an amazing idea! And the books–beautiful! I hope this project sweeps the nation and winds up in every city! Thank you, as always, for inspiring me to do, to be, to write more…to dream bigger!

    Like

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